Homepage | Archives | Calendar of Events | Exploring Akron | Elections | Voter Guide | Death Notices | People & Places | Get email news alerts | About Us
Community News

Red Cross to honor heroes at Acts of Courage event March 7

3/7/2013 - West Side Leader
      permalink bookmark

By Staff Writer

FAIRLAWN — Area heroes will be honored for their bravery and heroism at the annual American Red Cross of Summit and Portage Counties Acts of Courage event March 7 at the Hilton Akron/Fairlawn.

The event honors local residents who responded heroically in an emergency to save the life of another.

This year’s recipients, along with descriptions provided by the Red Cross, are:

  • Florence Wang, of Canfield: Through her heroic and unrelenting efforts, Wang was able to facilitate the necessary medical care that saved the life of a stranger halfway around the world. An American ex-pat working in China for Fairlawn-based OMNOVA Solutions took gravely ill and was admitted to a hospital. There, doctors prescribed a transfusion. But complications arose over the availability of the necessary blood. Concerned that its employee would not get the necessary blood in time to save his life, the executive staff of OMNOVA Solutions asked the American Red Cross of Summit and Portage Counties for assistance. The chapter contacted Wang, a board member of the American Red Cross of the Mahoning Valley. Of Chinese decent, Wang was able to use her Chinese connections to eventually get the individual the platelets he needed from the Red Cross Society of Shandong Province.
  • Selena Turner, of Akron: 13-year-old Selena enjoyed visiting her many neighbors in the apartment building in which she lived with her grandmother. She often stopped by to look in on neighbor Dave Materna. On one visit, though, Selena thought something was wrong. Materna appeared listless and at times incoherent. Eventually, he collapsed on his couch. His condition frightened Selena, but a friend of Materna’s dismissed Selena’s concerns. Selena sensed that Materna was extremely ill and needed help, so she quickly ran to her grandmother and calmly explained Materna’s condition. Selena’s grandmother suspected Materna was going into a diabetic coma, and the pair hurried back to Materna’s apartment. There, Selena followed her grandmother’s instruction and called 9-1-1. Within minutes, paramedics arrived and started an intravenous injection of glucose. Several minutes later, Materna recovered. After the paramedics left, Selena stayed to keep an eye on her friend to make sure he was all right.
  • Cuyahoga Falls Police Officer Eric Prange and Postal Service worker James Bowman, of Cuyahoga Falls: Bowman was delivering mail on his route when a car sped by, nearly hitting him. Bowman watched as the car went through a stop sign, struck a curb and crashed into the front of a nearby house. He called 9-1-1 as he ran to the scene. Prange, who was patrolling the area, also saw the crash and pulled his cruiser to a stop in front of the house. Entering the house through the hole the car had made, Bowman began to assess the situation. He found the residence’s lone occupant sitting in a nearby chair. Bowman could see that she had received a head wound, was bleeding and possibly going into shock. Meanwhile, Prange arrived and turned his attention to the driver of the car. He found her dazed and in obvious pain from the crash. Together, Bowman and Prange tended to the injured women and kept them calm until paramedics arrived. Both women were taken by ambulance to a nearby hospital.
  • Cuyahoga Falls Police Officer Eric Prange and Postal Service worker James Bowman, of Cuyahoga Falls: Bowman was delivering mail on his route when a car sped by, nearly hitting him. Bowman watched as the car went through a stop sign, struck a curb and crashed into the front of a nearby house. He called 9-1-1 as he ran to the scene. Prange, who was patrolling the area, also saw the crash and pulled his cruiser to a stop in front of the house. Entering the house through the hole the car had made, Bowman began to assess the situation. He found the residence’s lone occupant sitting in a nearby chair. Bowman could see that she had received a head wound, was bleeding and possibly going into shock. Meanwhile, Prange arrived and turned his attention to the driver of the car. He found her dazed and in obvious pain from the crash. Together, Bowman and Prange tended to the injured women and kept them calm until paramedics arrived. Both women were taken by ambulance to a nearby hospital.
  • Keith Dobbins, Barberton: While standing on the front deck of a friend’s mobile home, Dobbins was knocked to the ground by a nearby explosion. He looked up to see a nearby mobile home engulfed in flames. He yelled to neighbors to call 9-1-1 as he ran to the burning home. Dobbins pounded loudly on the door and heard a voice inside weakly calling for help. When a neighbor brought him a fire extinguisher, Dobbins fought back the flames long enough to enter the mobile home. He caught sight of a woman who was struggling to drag a man across the floor. Dobbins came to her assistance and carried the man through the doorway, followed by the panicked woman. Dobbins set the man down in the safety of his friend’s nearby yard. He then turned to see the trailer now completely engulfed in flames.
  • Summit County sheriff’s deputies Dora Evans and Rodney Tyson: Evans and Tyson were travelling the Ohio Turnpike on their way to Bedford, Pa., to process an extradition when they came upon an overturned semi-truck partially blocking the right-hand lane. As Tyson brought their cruiser to a stop, the pair noticed the driver was lying partially outside of the vehicle’s windshield. They ran to the man’s assistance and found him unconscious and unresponsive. They then noticed that gasoline from the truck was quickly pooling around the injured man’s body. Smoke also was beginning to pour out of the cab. Fearing an explosion, the deputies carefully raised the man’s body, and after several moments were able to remove him from the cab. They carried the man as far as they could, but they quickly realized they were still too dangerously close to the vehicle. With the help of two bystanders, they were able to finally get the driver a safe distance away. A nurse who had stopped at the scene began to administer first aid while others brought blankets to help the injured man and the deputies ward off the cold. Within minutes, troopers from the Ohio State Highway Patrol arrived on the scene, followed by an ambulance, which rushed the injured driver to a local hospital.
  • Darrell Terry, of Bolivar, and Dale Palmer, of Akron: During construction at Acme Plaza in Montrose, an excavation crew uncovered unmarked electrical lines. While inspecting the cables, Bob Fisher came into contact with an undetected short in the cables. Despite the risk of being electrocuted himself, co-worker Terry managed to tackle Fisher, separating him from the electrical current. Fisher was not breathing and slowly turning blue. The now growing commotion caught the attention of Palmer, an employee at nearby Eddy’s Bike Shop. Telling a fellow employee to call 9-1-1, Palmer raced across the parking lot to where a small crowd had gathered. He knew Fisher needed CPR. Having only seen a brief training film, Palmer began chest compressions. Meanwhile, Terry kept Fisher’s airway clear and his head tilted. When the paramedics arrived and took command of the situation, they told Palmer and Terry that their efforts had kept Fisher’s blood circulating, which saved his life.
  • Summit County sheriff’s deputies Mark McElroy, of Akron, and William McKinney, of Barberton: McElroy and McKinney were in Phoenix in May 2012 to extradite a prisoner to Ohio. While having dinner at their hotel, they caught sight of a child who was lying motionless at the bottom of the hotel’s pool just outside the restaurant window. The two men immediately ran to the area to find a hysterical man carrying the seemingly lifeless youngster out of the pool. After instructing someone in the gathering crowd to call 9-1-1, McElroy administered CPR to the unresponsive youth, while McKinney began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. The deputies continued their efforts for several minutes until the boy suddenly let out a soft gurgle and began taking a few shallow breaths. Within seconds, he was sitting up, shivering and crying. Paramedics arrived a short time later and rushed the youngster to a local hospital. He has since made a complete recovery. “I’ve done CPR in the past but never on a little child,” McElroy would recall later. “And I’ve never had an opportunity to save anyone’s life like that.”
  • Heather Pariso, of Akron, and Lynne Trenkelbach, of Akron: While running his third Akron Marathon, Tony Lindeman suffered sudden cardiac arrest and collapsed on the sidewalk. Pariso, an intensive care nurse at Akron City Hospital, also was running the marathon that day. She was just a few paces behind Lindeman when she saw him fall to the ground. When she noticed he was lying still and not trying to get back up, she went to his aid. Just behind Pariso, Trenkelbach also saw Lindeman fall. Trenkelbach, a nurse at Akron General Medical Center, stopped to help. Together, the pair checked Lindeman’s vital signs. There was no pulse, and he wasn’t breathing. They began CPR. Another runner stopped and called 9-1-1. While Trenkelbach continued chest compressions, Pariso helped the paramedics to deploy an automated external defibrillator (AED). Pariso placed the pads on Lindeman’s chest and activated the AED. The machine delivered a rapid shock, and Lindeman began to breathe again, and his pulse returned. He was quickly transferred to the ambulance, which took him to Akron City Hospital, where he awoke several hours later.
  • Dr. Michael Passero, of Akron: Passero was in the Intensive Care Unit at Akron General Medical Center when a loud popping sound from a nearby room caught his attention. Upon entering the room, Passero acknowledged an elderly man seated in a chair alongside the bed and proceeded to attend to the patient, still unsure what had caused the sound. However, a nurse who had followed him into the room cried out, “He’s got a gun!” and ran for help. With the safety of the patient and the hospital staff in mind, Passero determined to stay and attempt to prevent further violence. The man had allegedly shot the critically ill woman in the hopes of ending her suffering. But Passero realized that the woman was still breathing and needed immediate attention. During the next several minutes, Passero repeatedly asked the man to surrender the gun. The stalemate was finally broken when two hospital security guards arrived and wrestled the man to the floor. The woman died several hours later, but Passero was able to keep a volatile situation from escalating. The man is scheduled to stand trial on charges of aggravated murder this spring.
  • Ron Halvorson, of Green: Halvorson and his wife were on their way home from church when the car in front of them careened off the road and crashed into a nearby building. Halvorson pulled over and told his wife to call 9-1-1 as he jumped from his car. Halvorson ran to the vehicle to find the driver injured and unresponsive. He then became aware of a loud hissing sound — the vehicle had severed a natural gas line when it struck the building. Fearing an explosion, Halvorson knew he had to get the injured driver and himself to safety. Halvorson was joined by a fellow motorist, who had also seen the accident. They pulled the man from his vehicle and struggled to get him a safe distance away. A sheriff’s deputy arrived on the scene and called to the men that they needed to get still further away from the leak. The pair placed the injured man into the front seat of a nearby car and drove him to where the deputy was parked just as an EMS crew arrived on the scene.

At the Acts of Courage event, the Red Cross also will present the H. Peter Burg Award to retired Akron Deputy Mayor Dave Lieberth, who has been a lifelong champion for the vitality and progress of the Greater Akron area and its local community, according to Red Cross officials.

The award is presented to community members who have been selfless in service to the community. While CEO of FirstEnergy and chair of the local Red Cross Board of Directors, H. Peter Burg established a legacy of dedicated service to the Greater Akron community. Following his death in 2004, the American Red Cross established an award in his name to honor his memory and inspire others.

      permalink bookmark




No banner in farm